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English Grammar Tutorials

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  • Chapter 14. Punctuation (Cont'd...)

    punctuation

    14.1 Comma (cont'd...)

    (xii) To connect co-ordinating clauses when no conjunction is used and when they are short.
    It is found that steam propels, elevates, pumps, and drives.

    (xiii) Before certain co-ordinate conjugation.
    The man is not only accused, but also convicted.

    (xiv) After an absolute construction.
    The storm having ceased, we went out for shelter.

    (xv) To mark off a noun clause preceding the verb.
    Whatever he does, goes against his father’s will.
    That he would succeed in winning the game, no one ever doubted.

    14.2 Semicolon

    The semicolon is a large pause than comma and it is used:

    (i) Between clauses joined by co-ordinating conjunctions.
    To err is human; to forgive, divine.
    All were against him; but he struck to his point.

    (ii) Between clauses joined by conjunction, expressing contrast or inference like therefore, yet, then, however, so, otherwise, else, etc.
    My teacher helped me in best; yet I failed in the examination.
    I met him as he was leaving his house; otherwise I should not have known where he lived.
    He is far away from home; therefore he cannot come to cast his vote.

    (iii) To emphasize different clauses, so that the mind may dwell longer on each of them in succession.
    “As Caesar loved me, I weep for him; as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was valiant, I honour him; but as he was ambitious, I slew him, so there is tears for his love; joy for his fortune; honor for his valor; and death for his ambitions.” - Shakespeare.

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